Monday, October 31, 2011

Big East Cross Country Championship Race Highlights

Men's Race




Women's Race

Coghlan Outran The Black Dog, Too


Eamonn Coghlan Outran His Demons
By Ciara Dwyer
Independent.ie

Sunday October 30 2011

Last summer, Eamonn Coghlan was coming off Mount Juliet golf course, where he'd been playing at a Special Olympics charity event, when his phone flashed with a text message. It said "phone Enda" and it was urgent. Assuming that it was Enda Fitzpatrick, his son John's athletics coach in DCU, Coghlan contacted the number and asked if everything was OK.

The voice at the other end of the phone said, "Enda Kenny here."

"An Taoiseach?" replied the respectful Coghlan.

It was then that Kenny told the former athlete that he wanted to nominate him as one of his independent senators.

"He had some very nice things to say," says Coghlan, the soul of modesty and discretion.

And why wouldn't Kenny praise him? Coghlan is a legend in world athletics, one of the greatest Irish sportsmen of this or any other generation. A three-time Olympian, he was one of the greats of middle-distance running and won the World Championships 5,000 metres in Helsinki in 1983. But it wasn't gold medals all the way. Olympic glory was not for him. Three times it evaded him -- in 1976, 1980 and 1988. His tactics let him down -- by sprinting too soon and over-training. As he says himself, "I screwed up, big time." But he is far from bitter. "I don't begrudge it or look back with any regret. I made some stupid mistakes and I learned from them."

Coghlan's life has been the embodiment of the epitaph on his late coach Gerry Farnan's gravestone: "Don't quit when you are beaten. Fight back to an even more glorious victory, not only in competition but in life." In total the Dublin-born athlete ran 78 sub-four-minute miles, the most magnificent in Boston in 1994, when at the age of 41, having packed in a bureaucratic job in Dublin in the BLE (Bord Luthchleas na hEireann -- the Irish Athletics Board), he went back to do what he did best, running. He went out on a high, having fought back to an even more glorious victory with the superb time of 3:58.15.

The sporting hero is as impressive today as he ever was as "chairman of the boards and master of the mile", to use the nicknames he was given for his running prowess. Coghlan glows good health and dynamism, and were it not for his very likeable personality, he would make most men green with envy; at the age of 58, he still has the same size waist that he had when he was 16, 20, 30 and 40 -- 30-inches.

"It's simple. I don't over-eat," he says. "I used to train a hundred miles a week but now I go out two or three times a week or I mightn't go for a week or two. I'd always be busy, busy, busy. I don't watch what I eat. It's just that the good habits of my athletic life have remained with me. I wouldn't be a mad beer drinker and I like to have my glasses of wine but when it comes to eating, I'd eat small portions as opposed to pigging out and I'd burn it off.



"It's all about what you take in and what you put out. Health and fitness is simple. You have to work on your core. It's like with anything in life. People go to pot because they don't work on their core. Most people in Ireland and in the world are generally lazy when it comes to fitness but the more you get into a routine, the easier it becomes."

As a senator, he is working on two things -- health and education. All shall be revealed in November, he tells me.

Coghlan trains young athletes (he has a bunch of promising young men), he still helps with the fundraising for Our Lady's Children's Hospital in Crumlin, -- in particular the Children's Medical Research Foundation -- including for tomorrow's marathon. One of his aims is to raise more money for this good cause by bringing a team to New York next year for the marathon, just as he did 20 years ago.

He also chairs the high-performance committee within the Irish Sports Council.

He does all that when he's not zooming around on his motorbike, which he often uses to get him in to the Seanad, where he peels off his bike gear and emerges immaculate in a suit.

But family is what matters most to Coghlan. He tells me that when he first met his wife Yvonne at a disco in O'Connell's School, he was mad about her. "She's still great," he says, "but by God ... " And then he knocks on the table. I'd say there's no messing with Yvonne, his wife of 35 years. Coghlan credits her with being the more mature one all those years ago when he wanted to drop out of Villanova, when he was on a sports scholarship. Yvonne told him in no uncertain terms that she wouldn't be responsible for him leaving his running career. If he left it, she would leave him. Coghlan tells me that Yvonne has always been part of the team and people often comment that she's like a coach to him.

But back to the nomination. On the day that the Taoiseach called, Coghlan was told that he had an hour and a half to think about it but he didn't dither. He knew it was an honour and duly accepted.

"I was gobsmacked," Senator Coghlan told me when I met him in Leinster House last week. "And I was very honoured.

"I phoned Yvonne and she said, 'Are you serious?' I said, 'I am serious.'"

Even now there are days when he looks at his reflection in the mirror and asks, is this for real?

Why does he think Kenny nominated him?

"I would be a very positive person and I try to instil self-confidence and self-belief and drive into the little kids I train even though some of them might never end up running professionally."

Add to that the fact that Coghlan has character. Just like in the Kipling poem If, he has met triumph and disaster and taken both of them on the chin. They have made him the man he is today.

"I've broken world records, I've lost the Olympics and I've won World Championships," he says. In 1983, when he won the gold medal in Helsinki, Ireland came to a virtual standstill. Coghlan's race was all the more thrilling for his famous final spurt when he passed Dmitriy Dmitriyev, as he raised his fists in the air. The victory was all the sweeter when people knew the bad patch he had had before it. His first coach Gerry Farnan and his father Bill had both died and he had failed to shine in the Olympics. All of a sudden, his time had come.

"The fact that I came back is even better and the fact that I can relay [how to cope with] disappointment to the young kids that I coach is even better again."

Coghlan doesn't so much walk, as run. His energetic gait is a great sight to behold. As the newly appointed senator bounds down the steps of Leinster House to greet me, I can't help sitting up straighter, then smiling. Before he appears in front of me, I listen to him chatting to an usher. He has time for everyone and lovely manners. But this isn't just surface charm, there's a decent core to Coghlan. Twice a week, he visits his mother Kathleen, who, thanks to the Fair Deal scheme, is in a TLC nursing home. And his eyes fill as he tells me about the joys of fatherhood. He and Yvonne have four children -- Suzanne, Eamonn, Michael and John.

"It's been fantastic and it still is. And being a grandfather is even the same. We have two grandchildren. You're making me emotional now, but I am more proud about my family than running. We've a great relationship. My kids still come on summer holiday with Mam and Dad, even at 30 years of age. We're pals. I never talked down to the kids. We respected them and we got that respect back."

Respect is one of the main things about Coghlan. He gives it and it gets it back, and not just in his family.

Growing up on Cooley Road, Drimnagh, Coghlan was always running to the shops to get messages for the women on the road. Because he was fast, he got an extra few pence. It wasn't long before he was running races in the Phoenix Park, winning and loving it. Coghlan was mildly dyslexic (he still is) and he was bullied in school, yet the running saved him.

He learned great life lessons about resilience from his first coach Gerry Farnan, who kept his eye on the big picture. Later, coach Jumbo Elliot at Villanova University in Pennsylvania, was equally influential. In many ways, Coghlan's years in America formed him. It gave him a self-belief and a self-confidence. In Ireland, he knew that confidence was perceived as cockiness -- he doesn't blame Ireland, saying instead that this is an islanders' mentality. But America's can-do attitude was the making of him; along with the endless miles of hard training.

"It was a gradual transformation," he says, "but I realised that I was just as good as these guys in Villanova. If they were that confident, why couldn't I be too? It was a combination of growing self -belief, natural talent and the work. Those three things started to merge and then I became really confident about everything I was doing on the track.

"I still feel like a runner and think like a runner, even though I can't run like a runner anymore in terms of the competitive side because I'm too old [but] you have that in you."

Coghlan isn't a depressive but he understands depression; he suffered from it for a spell when he came back from the States, having retired from athletics the first time.

"I was seriously depressed, frighteningly depressed from the point of view that I didn't enjoy anything. When I'd wake up in the morning, I wanted to sleep all day long.

"I'd left America, where I had a life of adulation, limousines here, limousines there, whatever you wanted you got."

He came home to a very different scene, where he found the job in sports administration a difficult environment to cope with. "The political life in the Seanad is an awful lot better than that political life in sport and you can quote that," he said.

In his autobiography, Chairman of the Boards -- Master of the Mile (which was written with George Kimball) Coghlan recalls how he even felt suicidal.

"I was totally swamped with depression. It was a horrible, black feeling that induced an almost chemical-like low and despondency. It was like nothing I had ever previously experienced."

Weeks later, while driving to a BLE meeting, he found himself having to fight an urge to drive into the Liffey.

"I fought the impulse and pulled the car over to the side of the road and felt myself hyperventilating with the shock of what I had just thought. I saw no way out. I used to be the happy-go-lucky full of energy guy but I was feeling weak and miserable and felt a pathetic sight in Dublin's Docklands resisting an impulse to commit suicide."

Coghlan made an appointment with a doctor in Blackrock Clinic who told him that he was exhibiting classic signs of a form of depression.

"He [ the doctor] explained that there were understandable anxieties prompted by the end of my running career and the move back to Ireland."

He was prescribed an anti-depressant drug and took two weeks off work but he didn't feel any better. Finally, Eamonn wrote a letter of resignation saying that he was leaving because the chief executive of BLE had no executive powers. When he posted the letter it was as if the weight of the world had been lifted from his shoulders. He resigned for himself and his family and never looked back.

As we all know, he then left the BLE and went back to do what he did best -- running. Nor does he dwell on the disappointments of the Olympics. He is grateful for having lived that dream and then eventually bouncing back to glory.

"I'd visualise myself winning a race. Before I'd leave my room, the last thing I'd do was look in the mirror and whisper, 'come on you little f**ker. You better win this race.' But this isn't just about sport, it's about life. It's all about vision and dream and belief. But you can't sit on your ass and do nothing. You've got to have the discipline to go with it."

Coghlan is happy with his life. That's because he has worked on it. He is even a good loser. "I'm captain of Luttrellstown Castle Golf and Country Club but I'm so bloody bad at golf, people don't believe it. They think this former athlete should be a great sportsman. I play with guys who might be 20 stone in weight, who have cigars hanging out of their mouths but they're able to play great golf. It's embarrassing, but I'm a good loser. I enjoy the banter and the challenge of trying to bloody well get a par."

That's the key to Eamonn Coghlan. He enjoys his life and as a result people enjoy his company. I know I certainly did.

Eamonn has been working with Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin as their ambassador for this year's National Lottery Dublin Marathon. 'Team Eamonn Coghlan' has helped raise money for the Children's Medical & Research Foundation (CMRF) at Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin as part of its Kilometres for Kids Campaign. To find out more about how to support the CMRF, visit www.kilo metresforkids.ie

- Ciara Dwyer

Sunday, October 30, 2011

Runner's Tribe Quickie with Mathew Mildenhall



Runner's Tribe Interview with Villanova's Mathew Mildenhall

RT: You guys are off to Louisville for Conference this weekend, can you guys emulate the All Blacks and win while doing it the hard way?

MM: The guys and I are really looking forward to this weekend. We’re expecting it to be just as much of a nail bitter as the AB’s [New Zealand's All Blacks rugby team] over the Frogs (Editors note: The Runner’s Tribe does not take responsibility for Mathews racial comments regarding the sovereign state of France). However, we do have a few Kiwi’s in our way, with the boys at Providence running awesome this year, but we’re looking forward to the showdown. The Big East is such a big deal for both the team and the coaching staff and this is the first time in a decade we have had a legitimate chance at taking home the title. So we’ll take it anyway we have to run it (be it ugly or not).

RT: Typically you have finished the money-end of each season as Villanova’s no.1 guy both on and off the course, are you starting to find some form?

MM: This year definitely hasn’t gone according to plan. I’ve really come to realize how big of a toll stress can play on a runner. Unfortunately this is part and parcel with being a student athlete at such an academically rigorous school. It has been a combination of a few things that we think (my coaches and I) has left me pretty drained. Things are turning around for the better, and after a great summer and an even better opener at the Mainline Invite I know the form is there. It’s really great to have a team of studs who have stepped up and kept us competitive while a few of the guys get back on track.



RT: Two years ago your team was 11th in the country and you were All-American, yet last year you didn’t quite match the same success. What happened?

MM: Last year was one of those years where things didn’t seem to click across the board, which is a tough thing to swallow on the back of such a good season the year before. We had a few injuries and illnesses take down some of our top guys early, but again we had guys step up to keep the momentum rolling. In fact I would say that a lot of guys left the season on a high note. We really got up and had a stella run at regional’s (considering the circumstances) placing second behind a very good Princeton team. NCAA’s was always going to be tough running against such a high caliber field especially when things aren’t going exactly to plan. We ended up 23rd which is honestly where we were probably expected to fall.



RT: Your team mates Matt Gibney and Keith Capecci are both running well this season and will be huge factors at Conference, who do you think would win in a mud-wrestling fight between those two?

MM: To your first point: The boys are really leading the charge out there this season! It’s great to see Gibney showing us distance boys how it’s done, and Keith being a Bawse as usual.

Now to the meat of your question: That’s a huge call. You have two large Alpha males squaring off. This thing is definitely going late into the 12th. If I’m going to go with my gut I’d have to go with Keith. Having had experience with the big guy in the ring I can say first hand that he knows how to get the job done. However if you’ve ever seen the Gibinator with 100 to go you know he won’t go down without a fight. I say Keith gets it in a choke out- give or take some hair pulling.



RT: I heard that you are engaged to be married, is that true?

MM: Mathew declined to offer a legitimate response to this question obviously due to the seriousness of the situation. We at The Runner’s Tribe wish him all the best.

Saturday, October 29, 2011

Men & Women Sweep -- Post Race Interviews





Reid & Mimic Go 1-2, Lead Villanova to Big East XC Title
4th Consecutive Title Makes 14 Overall


The Villanova women won their fourth consecutive Big East cross country championship today in Louisville, KY. It represented the women's 14th overall Big East XC title. Thanks to the 1-2 finish of Sheila Reid and Bogdana Mimic, and a strong overall team performance, Villanova was able to defeat three national top-10 teams in #7 Providence, #6 Georgetown, and #8 Syracuse. It wasn't easy, as Providence was only 9 total places off of Villanova's performance. One key to the team win was the performance of Callie Hogan, who came home ahead of the #5 runners from Providence, Georgetown and Syracuse and secured the victory. "It took a complete team effort for us to win today and that is exactly what happened," coach Gina Procaccio said. "Everyone had to set up for us and I am so proud of our runners for getting their job done. It was a great team effort and that is what makes this championship so fulfilling for us." Reid's victory was her third straight Big East individual cross country title. "We point to this meet in training and the team was ready to get the job done today," Procaccio said. "Winning a conference championship gives us great momentum moving forward into the next three weeks."

Place  Points   Team        1   2   3   4   5   6   7   
1 54 Villanova 1 2 12 16 23 (38)(44)
2 63 Providence 4 6 9 19 25 (32)(47)
3 77 Georgetown 5 13 15 20 24 (29)(39)
4 92 Syracuse 10 14 17 21 30 (33)(40)
4 92 W Virginia 3 7 11 28 43 (46)(56)
6 136 Notre Dame 18 26 27 31 34 (37)(42)
7 165 Connecticut 8 35 36 41 45 (51)(57)
8 249 S Florida 22 49 52 62 64 (75)(88)
9 301 Marquette 50 58 60 66 67 (74)(82)
10 322 Rutgers 53 61 68 69 71 (80)(92)
11 340 Louisville 55 59 70 73 83 (93)(97)
12 342 Cincinnati 48 54 77 79 84 (89)(96)
13 416 St. John's 63 72 87 95 99 (101)(104)
14 428 DePaul 76 81 86 91 94 (105) --
15 462 Seton Hall 65 78 102 108 109 (110)(111)
16 476 Pittsburgh 85 90 98 100 103 (106)(107)


Villanova
1 1 Sheila Reid Sr Villanova 19:40.9 5:17 3,300m: 11:01
2 2 Bogdana Mimic Sr Villanova 19:51.2 5:20 3,300m: 11:01
12 12 Nicky Akande So Villanova 20:26.1 5:29 3,300m: 11:03
16 16 Emily Lipari So Villanova 20:36.4 5:32 3,300m: 11:07
23 23 Caroline Hogan GS Villanova 20:54.5 5:37 3,300m: 11:21
38 38 Summer Cook Jr Villanova 21:21.0 5:44 3,300m: 11:33
44 44 Courtney Chapman Fr Villanova 21:38.8 5:49 3,300m: 11:27
54 -- Stephanie Schappert Fr Villanova 22:01.2 5:55 3,300m: 11:41
73 -- Megan Venables Fr Villanova 22:34.1 6:04 3,300m: 12:11




PL Points Bib Name YR Team Time 1km Pace Mile Pace
1 1 #362 Sheila Reid Sr Villanova 19:40.9 3:17 5:17 3,300m: 11:01
2 2 #360 Bogdana Mimic Sr Villanova 19:51.2 3:19 5:20 3,300m: 11:01
3 3 #372 Kate Harrison Sr West Virgini 19:52.7 3:19 5:20 3,300m: 11:01
4 4 #298 Emily Sisson So Providence 19:57.4 3:20 5:22 3,300m: 11:01
5 5 #236 Emily Infeld Sr Georgetown 20:02.2 3:21 5:23 3,300m: 11:01
6 6 #296 Laura Nagel So Providence 20:12.6 3:23 5:26 3,300m: 11:02
7 7 #370 Katie Gillespie Jr West Virgini 20:14.0 3:23 5:26 3,300m: 11:01
8 8 #221 Lauren Sara So Connecticut 20:16.0 3:23 5:27 3,300m: 12:21
9 9 #292 Hannah Davidson Sr Providence 20:19.0 3:24 5:27 3,300m: 11:02
10 10 #349 Lauren Penney Sr Syracuse 20:21.6 3:24 5:28 3,300m: 11:03
11 11 #367 Sarah-Anne Brault Jr West Virgini 20:24.0 3:24 5:29 3,300m: 11:04
12 12 #354 Olanike Akande So Villanova 20:26.1 3:25 5:29 3,300m: 11:03
13 13 #237 Emily Jones Jr Georgetown 20:30.4 3:25 5:30 3,300m: 11:03
14 14 #348 Sarah Pagano Jr Syracuse 20:33.1 3:26 5:31 3,300m: 11:05
15 15 #238 Kirsten Kasper Jr Georgetown 20:34.7 3:26 5:32 3,300m: 11:14
16 16 #359 Emily Lipari So Villanova 20:36.4 3:26 5:32 3,300m: 11:07
17 17 #351 Heather Stephens Sr Syracuse 20:36.8 3:27 5:32 3,300m: 11:12
18 18 #273 Jessica Rydberg Jr Notre Dame 20:41.2 3:27 5:33 3,300m: 11:14
19 19 #293 Charlotte Ffrench O'Carroll Jr Providence 20:43.5 3:28 5:34 3,300m: 11:15
20 20 #234 Katrina Coogan Fr Georgetown 20:50.6 3:29 5:36 3,300m: 11:15
21 21 #352 Shaylyn Tuite Fr Syracuse 20:53.4 3:29 5:37 3,300m: 11:14
22 22 #335 Allie Prendergast Sr South Florid 20:54.5 3:29 5:37 3,300m: 11:21
23 23 #358 Caroline Hogan GS Villanova 20:54.5 3:29 5:37 3,300m: 11:21
24 24 #239 Annamarie Maag Fr Georgetown 20:55.6 3:30 5:37 3,300m: 11:15
25 25 #294 Shelby Greany Jr Providence 20:58.2 3:30 5:38 3,300m: 11:15
26 26 #268 Kelly Curran So Notre Dame 21:01.2 3:31 5:39 3,300m: 11:25
27 27 #267 Alexa Aragon So Notre Dame 21:03.5 3:31 5:39 3,300m: 11:25
28 28 #373 Ahna Lewis Sr West Virgini 21:04.3 3:31 5:39 3,300m: 11:25
29 29 #240 Hannha Neczypor Fr Georgetown 21:08.2 3:32 5:41 3,300m: 11:22
30 30 #342 Natalie Busby Sr Syracuse 21:12.5 3:32 5:42 3,300m: 11:28
31 31 #270 Gabby Gonzales Fr Notre Dame 21:12.6 3:33 5:42 3,300m: 11:25
32 32 #300 Grace Thek So Providence 21:13.5 3:33 5:42 3,300m: 11:30
33 33 #350 Jessie Peterson Fr Syracuse 21:13.8 3:33 5:42 3,300m: 11:33
34 34 #278 Rachel Velarde Sr Notre Dame 21:16.8 3:33 5:43 3,300m: 11:30
35 35 #213 Lindsay Crevoiserat Fr Connecticut 21:17.7 3:33 5:43 3,300m: 11:28
36 36 #217 Allison Lasnicki So Connecticut 21:18.4 3:33 5:43 3,300m: 11:31
37 37 #274 McKinzie Schulz So Notre Dame 21:20.7 3:34 5:44 3,300m: 11:31
38 38 #357 Summer Cook Jr Villanova 21:21.0 3:34 5:44 3,300m: 11:33
39 39 #243 Joanna Stevens So Georgetown 21:28.3 3:35 5:46 3,300m: 11:30
40 40 #347 Rebekah MacKay GS Syracuse 21:29.1 3:35 5:46 3,300m: 11:40
41 41 #219 Brigitte Mania Jr Connecticut 21:33.0 3:36 5:47 3,300m: 11:34
42 42 #277 Rebecca Tracy Jr Notre Dame 21:34.8 3:36 5:48 3,300m: 11:30
43 43 #366 Stephanie Aldea Jr West Virgini 21:36.0 3:36 5:48 3,300m: 11:34
44 44 #356 Courtney Chapman Fr Villanova 21:38.8 3:37 5:49 3,300m: 11:27
45 -- #346 Lauren Kersjes So Syracuse 21:39.0 3:37 5:49 3,300m: 11:33
46 -- #232 Lauren Borduin Sr Georgetown 21:40.5 3:37 5:49 3,300m: 11:33
47 -- #344 Alexandra Clinton So Syracuse 21:41.2 3:37 5:49 3,300m: 11:41
48 45 #223 Heather Wilson Sr Connecticut 21:42.1 3:37 5:50 3,300m: 11:43
49 46 #369 Kaylyn Christopher Sr West Virgini 21:43.2 3:38 5:50 3,300m: 11:45
50 47 #291 Mary Kate Champagne Sr Providence 21:44.1 3:38 5:50 3,300m: 11:47
51 48 #211 Alison Zukowski Sr Cincinnati 21:45.0 3:38 5:50 3,300m: 11:47
52 49 #339 Yasmin Smith Sr South Florid 21:55.6 3:40 5:53 3,300m: 11:36
53 -- #271 Molly Hirt Sr Notre Dame 21:59.9 3:40 5:54 3,300m: 11:47
54 -- #363 Stephanie Schappert Fr Villanova 22:01.2 3:41 5:55 3,300m: 11:41
55 50 #261 Elisia Meyle Fr Marquette 22:01.3 3:41 5:55 3,300m: 11:57
56 51 #215 Courtney Dinnan Sr Connecticut 22:04.2 3:41 5:56 3,300m: 11:31
57 52 #331 Shaniel Chambers Sr South Florid 22:14.5 3:43 5:58 3,300m: 12:01
58 53 #303 Brianna Deming So Rutgers 22:15.0 3:43 5:58 3,300m: 11:56
59 54 #202 Emily Clay Fr Cincinnati 22:15.3 3:43 5:59 3,300m: 11:58
60 55 #244 Ariel Briggs So Louisville 22:18.0 3:43 5:59 3,300m: 11:59
61 -- #295 Erin Murphy So Providence 22:20.2 3:44 6:00 3,300m: 11:57
62 56 #371 Jordan Hamric So West Virgini 22:20.5 3:44 6:00 3,300m: 12:08
63 57 #214 Meghan Cunningham Sr Connecticut 22:22.0 3:44 6:00 3,300m: 11:39
64 58 #259 Courtney Kelly Jr Marquette 22:22.4 3:44 6:00 3,300m: 12:06
65 59 #246 Madeleine Davidson Fr Louisville 22:22.7 3:44 6:01 3,300m: 11:31
66 60 #266 Carly Windt Jr Marquette 22:23.8 3:44 6:01 3,300m: 12:09
67 61 #301 Anjelica Brinkofski Jr Rutgers 22:25.0 3:45 6:01 3,300m: 12:07
68 -- #375 Aubrey Moskal Jr West Virgini 22:26.1 3:45 6:01 3,300m: 12:08
69 62 #341 Kelli Williams Fr South Florid 22:29.5 3:45 6:02 3,300m: 12:10
70 63 #316 Samantha Meyerhoff SR St. John's 22:29.8 3:45 6:02 3,300m: 12:14
71 64 #340 Devin Spoerle Sr South Florid 22:31.7 3:46 6:03 3,300m: 12:07
72 65 #327 Mary Migton Fr Seton Hall 22:32.9 3:46 6:03 3,300m: 12:03
73 -- #365 Megan Venables Fr Villanova 22:34.1 3:46 6:04 3,300m: 12:11
74 -- #276 Susanna Sullivan Sr Notre Dame 22:36.7 3:47 6:04 3,300m: 12:10
75 66 #263 Christina Sliepka Jr Marquette 22:39.5 3:47 6:05 3,300m: 12:15
76 67 #255 Sarah Ball So Marquette 22:40.2 3:47 6:05 3,300m: 12:15
77 68 #302 Ashley Deckert So Rutgers 22:40.5 3:47 6:05 3,300m: 12:26
78 69 #306 Allison Payenski Fr Rutgers 22:42.8 3:48 6:06 3,300m: 12:25
79 70 #253 Michelle Molodynia Fr Louisville 22:43.3 3:48 6:06 3,300m: 12:10
80 71 #308 Rashmi Singh So Rutgers 22:43.8 3:48 6:06 3,300m: 12:28
81 72 #312 Nicole Cocozza SR St. John's 22:45.5 3:48 6:07 3,300m: 12:19
82 -- #299 Julie Solimine Fr Providence 22:46.3 3:48 6:07 3,300m: 12:10
83 73 #252 Cassandra Martin Jr Louisville 22:48.9 3:49 6:08 3,300m: 12:23
84 74 #258 Kate Horan Sr Marquette 22:49.1 3:49 6:08 3,300m: 12:22
85 75 #334 Christine Johnston Sr South Florid 22:51.9 3:49 6:08 3,300m: 12:18
86 -- #216 Cassandra Goutos So Connecticut 22:52.3 3:49 6:08 3,300m: 12:19
87 76 #229 Claire O'Brien Sr DePaul 22:52.9 3:49 6:09 3,300m: 12:23
88 77 #206 Lauren Goodwin Fr Cincinnati 22:54.6 3:49 6:09 3,300m: 12:27
89 78 #329 Hughnique Rolle Jr Seton Hall 22:57.8 3:50 6:10 3,300m: 12:19
90 -- #220 Kimberly Moran Jr Connecticut 23:00.7 3:51 6:11 3,300m: 11:02
91 79 #205 Jill Glassmeyer Sr Cincinnati 23:00.9 3:51 6:11 3,300m: 12:23
92 80 #307 Victoria Pontecorvo Jr Rutgers 23:02.6 3:51 6:11 3,300m: 12:25
93 -- #377 Hallie Portner Jr West Virgini 23:07.4 3:52 6:12 3,300m: 12:18
94 81 #230 Kelly Pickering Sr DePaul 23:08.5 3:52 6:13 3,300m: 12:24
95 82 #256 Alyssa Beste Sr Marquette 23:09.4 3:52 6:13 3,300m: 12:25
96 83 #249 Maria Frigo So Louisville 23:12.5 3:52 6:14 3,300m: 12:21
97 84 #209 Kaitlyn Meyer Fr Cincinnati 23:18.1 3:53 6:15 3,300m: 12:31
98 85 #287 Morgan Perry Fr Pittsburgh 23:19.5 3:54 6:16 3,300m: 12:31
99 86 #231 Toni Salvatore Sr DePaul 23:22.0 3:54 6:16 3,300m: 12:28
100 -- #264 Alyssa Stevens Sr Marquette 23:24.0 3:54 6:17 3,300m: 12:33
101 87 #320 Chelsea Trant SO St. John's 23:24.5 3:54 6:17 3,300m: 12:38
102 -- #257 Hannah Frett So Marquette 23:24.8 3:55 6:17 3,300m: 12:28
103 88 #332 Rachel Etienne Sr South Florid 23:29.0 3:55 6:18 3,300m: 12:41
104 -- #336 Jessie Prendergast So South Florid 23:31.8 3:56 6:19 3,300m: 12:43
105 89 #204 Ashley Earman Fr Cincinnati 23:32.2 3:56 6:19 3,300m: 12:38
106 90 #289 Stephanie Powers So Pittsburgh 23:35.0 3:56 6:20 3,300m: 12:38
107 91 #227 Jackie Kasal Fr DePaul 23:38.7 3:57 6:21 3,300m: 12:36
108 92 #305 Felicia O'Donnell Fr Rutgers 23:42.2 3:57 6:22 3,300m: 12:48
109 93 #251 Megan Klein Fr Louisville 23:47.5 3:58 6:23 3,300m: 12:52
110 94 #226 Taylor Hynes Fr DePaul 23:50.0 3:59 6:24 3,300m: 12:51
111 95 #313 Michelle Duffy JR St. John's 23:51.5 3:59 6:24 3,300m: 12:46
112 96 #203 Bridget Connolly Sr Cincinnati 23:54.2 3:59 6:25 3,300m: 12:48
113 97 #248 Paige Dooley So Louisville 23:58.3 4:00 6:26 3,300m: 12:51
114 -- #337 Abby Ritter Fr South Florid 23:58.9 4:00 6:26 3,300m: 12:49
115 98 #285 Miya Johnson Sr Pittsburgh 23:59.6 4:00 6:27 3,300m: 12:51
116 99 #311 Alexis Bean JR St. John's 24:02.1 4:01 6:27 3,300m: 12:51
117 -- #210 Cortney Staruch Jr Cincinnati 24:08.0 4:02 6:29 3,300m: 12:45
118 100 #282 Rachel Erny Sr Pittsburgh 24:09.5 4:02 6:29 3,300m: 13:07
119 -- #309 Jennifer Spitzer Jr Rutgers 24:16.8 4:03 6:31 3,300m: 12:48
120 101 #315 Angela Jarvela SO St. John's 24:28.9 4:05 6:34 3,300m: 13:08
121 102 #323 Nyala Eddings So Seton Hall 24:30.0 4:05 6:35 3,300m: 13:12
122 -- #245 Kacey Cox So Louisville 24:32.5 4:06 6:35 3,300m: 13:14
123 103 #288 Korinne Piper Jr Pittsburgh 24:35.7 4:06 6:36 3,300m: 13:14
124 -- #207 Sara Knollman So Cincinnati 24:43.1 4:08 6:38 3,300m: 13:18
125 104 #321 Aryon Trujillo SR St. John's 24:47.4 4:08 6:39 3,300m: 13:02
126 105 #228 Erin Lakie Sr DePaul 24:51.8 4:09 6:41 3,300m: 13:14
127 106 #284 Mallory Hudson Fr Pittsburgh 25:04.4 4:11 6:44 3,300m: 13:16
128 -- #304 Kelly Flannigan Sr Rutgers 25:08.0 4:12 6:45 3,300m: 13:17
129 -- #250 Olivia Horvath So Louisville 25:12.3 4:12 6:46 3,300m: 13:33
130 107 #280 Julia Christensen Fr Pittsburgh 25:27.5 4:15 6:50 3,300m: 13:31
131 -- #279 Emily Barno Jr Pittsburgh 25:41.2 4:17 6:54 3,300m: 13:36
132 -- #290 Elizabeth Tabor Jr Pittsburgh 26:25.7 4:25 7:06 3,300m: 13:57
133 108 #328 Louisa Ozimek Fr Seton Hall 26:53.7 4:29 7:13 3,300m: 14:13
134 -- #241 Claire Richardson GS Georgetown 26:57.0 4:30 7:14 3,300m: 11:03
135 109 #325 Marigot Lustyk Jr Seton Hall 27:21.3 4:34 7:21 3,300m: 14:34
136 110 #330 Jemessah Walker Sr Seton Hall 27:36.9 4:37 7:25 3,300m: 14:38
137 111 #322 Christina Chafos Jr Seton Hall 28:28.8 4:45 7:39 3,300m: 15:19
138 -- #326 Kristen May So Seton Hall 28:29.7 4:45 7:39 3,300m: 15:22

Villanova Men Dominate Big East XC Championships

The 16th-ranked Villanova men showed off their great depth today in Louisville, KY, winning the Big East cross country title in dominating fashion. The men won the meet with a mere 43 points (a 51 point margin over the runner up Georgetown Hoyas). The men's top five boasted a tiny 15.9 second spread (with Villanova's 6th Mathew Mildenhall only a second behind #5). Villanova had its 6th finisher in the chute before any other of the top five teams had its 2nd runner home. Coach Marcus O'Sullivan had this to say about the team's performance: "We were able to win a championship because the guys came to understand during the week that an opportunity like this does not come around all that often. When you have this much depth and a very talented team there is an opportunity to do really well. Our entire team realized that the only way to have their talent shine through was to fight for it and have a desire to win. Nobody was going to give us a championship; we had to take it and the team understood that sense of urgency." Six Villanova men made All Big East. Georgetown was runner up, with Louisville third. #14 Providence finished fifth.

"Winning today takes some pressure off of me as well as the whole team," O'Sullivan said. "My last words to the guys were not to rest on our laurels for too long. I want them to understand just how good we are and then move on from there. We can savor this for a couple of hours and then get going again as we move forward towards the next two postseason meets."

Villanova  43
5 5 Matthew Gibney Sr Villanova 23:41.4 4:46
6 6 Keith Capecci Sr Villanova 23:42.2 4:46
8 8 Ryan Sheridan GS Villanova 23:51.3 4:48
11 11 Samuel McEntee Fr Villanova 23:54.1 4:49
13 13 Matthew Kane Jr Villanova 23:57.3 4:50
14 14 Mathew Mildenhall Jr Villanova 23:58.6 4:50
32 31 Brian Long GS Villanova 24:26.3 4:55
41 -- Greg Morrin Jr Villanova 24:39.3 4:58
67 -- John Pickhaver Jr Villanova 25:23.9 5:07

PL Points Team Runners: 1 2 3 4 5 (6) (7)
1 43 Villanova 5 6 8 11 13 (14) (31)
2 94 Georgetown 7 15 16 20 36 (45) (49)
3 96 Louisville 3 18 22 24 29 (42) (53)
4 97 Syracuse 9 19 21 23 25 (26) (30)
5 116 Providence 2 17 28 34 35 (38) (46)
6 119 Notre Dame 10 12 27 33 37 (44) (48)
7 201 Marquette 32 39 40 43 47 (52) (58)
8 218 Cincinnati 1 50 54 56 57 (59) (61)
9 273 DePaul 4 63 64 69 73 (78) (79)
10 274 Connecticut 41 51 55 62 65 (67) (82)
11 361 Rutgers 66 71 72 75 77 (87) (91)
12 388 South Florida 60 70 83 86 89 (92) (98)
13 390 Pittsburgh 68 76 80 81 85 (88) (93)
14 437 Seton Hall 74 84 90 94 95 (96) (97)


PL Points Bib Name YR Team Time 1km Pace Mile Pace
1 1 #14 Eric Finan Sr Cincinnati 23:17.7 2:55 4:42 5,500m: 16:03
2 2 #105 David McCarthy Sr Providence 23:29.3 2:57 4:44 5,500m: 16:02
3 3 #59 Matthew Hughes Sr Louisville 23:38.2 2:58 4:46 5,500m: 16:03
4 4 #36 Matt Graham Sr DePaul 23:38.4 2:58 4:46 5,500m: 16:05
5 5 #151 Matthew Gibney Sr Villanova 23:41.4 2:58 4:46 5,500m: 16:17
6 6 #150 Keith Capecci Sr Villanova 23:42.2 2:58 4:46 5,500m: 16:04
7 7 #45 Mark Dennin Jr Georgetown 23:49.7 2:59 4:48 5,500m: 16:16
8 8 #159 Ryan Sheridan GS Villanova 23:51.3 2:59 4:48 5,500m: 16:16
9 9 #139 Pat Dupont Sr Syracuse 23:51.7 2:59 4:48 5,500m: 16:16
10 10 #78 Martin Grady So Notre Dame 23:52.2 2:59 4:48 5,500m: 16:16
11 11 #155 Samuel McEntee Fr Villanova 23:54.1 3:00 4:49 5,500m: 16:19
12 12 #84 Jeremy Rae Jr Notre Dame 23:55.4 3:00 4:49 5,500m: 16:20
13 13 #152 Matthew Kane Jr Villanova 23:57.3 3:00 4:50 5,500m: 16:17
14 14 #156 Mathew Mildenhall Jr Villanova 23:58.6 3:00 4:50 5,500m: 16:20
15 15 #50 Alex Lundy GS Georgetown 24:05.2 3:01 4:51 5,500m: 16:16
16 16 #53 Andrew Springer So Georgetown 24:05.6 3:01 4:51 5,500m: 16:16
17 17 #100 Dominic Channon Sr Providence 24:06.4 3:01 4:51 5,500m: 16:15
18 18 #55 Tyler Byrne So Louisville 24:06.9 3:01 4:51 5,500m: 16:21
19 19 #142 Tito Medrano Sr Syracuse 24:10.6 3:02 4:52 5,500m: 16:22
20 20 #49 TC Lumbar GS Georgetown 24:10.6 3:02 4:52 5,500m: 16:22
21 21 #143 Forrest Misenti Jr Syracuse 24:11.0 3:02 4:52
22 22 #56 Gordon Dooley Jr Louisville 24:11.2 3:02 4:52 5,500m: 16:25
23 23 #141 Sean Keefe So Syracuse 24:11.4 3:02 4:52 5,500m: 16:25
24 24 #54 Matthew Bruce Sr Louisville 24:11.8 3:02 4:52 5,500m: 16:24
25 25 #145 Andrew Palmer Fr Syracuse 24:12.2 3:02 4:53 5,500m: 16:23
26 26 #146 Max Straneva Fr Syracuse 24:18.7 3:03 4:54 5,500m: 16:27
27 27 #82 JP Malette Jr Notre Dame 24:19.8 3:03 4:54 5,500m: 16:30
28 28 #106 Shane Quinn Fr Providence 24:20.9 3:03 4:54 5,500m: 16:16
29 29 #60 Luke Lovelace Sr Louisville 24:22.4 3:03 4:55 5,500m: 16:29
30 30 #147 Ryan Urie Fr Syracuse 24:25.9 3:04 4:55 5,500m: 16:36
31 -- #148 Joe Whelan So Syracuse 24:26.2 3:04 4:55 5,500m: 16:36
32 31 #153 Brian Long GS Villanova 24:26.3 3:04 4:55 5,500m: 16:24
33 32 #71 Blake Johnson Sr Marquette 24:28.6 3:04 4:56 5,500m: 16:41
34 33 #77 Jordan Carlson Sr Notre Dame 24:28.9 3:04 4:56 5,500m: 16:30
35 34 #101 Benjamin Connor Fr Providence 24:29.1 3:04 4:56 5,500m: 16:36
36 35 #104 Julian Matthews Sr Providence 24:32.4 3:04 4:57 5,500m: 16:22
37 36 #51 John Murray Fr Georgetown 24:32.9 3:05 4:57 5,500m: 16:36
38 37 #80 Kelly Lynch Sr Notre Dame 24:37.4 3:05 4:58 5,500m: 16:42
39 38 #108 Alex Wallace Jr Providence 24:38.6 3:05 4:58 5,500m: 16:37
40 39 #74 Jack Senefeld So Marquette 24:38.6 3:05 4:58 5,500m: 16:42
41 -- #157 Greg Morrin Jr Villanova 24:39.3 3:05 4:58 5,500m: 16:44
42 40 #70 Jack Hackett Jr Marquette 24:40.9 3:06 4:58 5,500m: 16:44
43 41 #22 Nick Aguila Jr Connecticut 24:41.6 3:06 4:58 5,500m: 16:48
44 42 #63 Mattias Wolter So Louisville 24:48.0 3:06 5:00 5,500m: 16:48
45 43 #66 Connor Callahan Jr Marquette 24:50.4 3:07 5:00 5,500m: 16:52
46 44 #87 DJ Thornton So Notre Dame 24:51.7 3:07 5:00 5,500m: 16:51
47 45 #46 Ben Furcht So Georgetown 24:52.1 3:07 5:01 5,500m: 16:43
48 46 #97 Ahmed Ali Jr Providence 24:52.5 3:07 5:01 5,500m: 16:51
49 -- #103 Eric Malnati Jr Providence 24:52.6 3:07 5:01 5,500m: 16:51
50 -- #144 Rob Molke So Syracuse 24:55.0 3:07 5:01 5,500m: 16:41
51 47 #65 Peter Bolgert Sr Marquette 24:55.8 3:07 5:01 5,500m: 16:54
52 48 #76 Randall Babb Sr Notre Dame 24:56.1 3:07 5:01 5,500m: 16:53
53 49 #52 Bobby Peavey So Georgetown 24:56.7 3:07 5:01 5,500m: 16:37
54 50 #12 Oliver Book Jr Cincinnati 25:02.0 3:08 5:03 5,500m: 16:47
55 -- #48 Brian King Fr Georgetown 25:05.5 3:09 5:03 5,500m: 16:55
56 -- #85 Walter Schafer So Notre Dame 25:06.5 3:09 5:03 5,500m: 16:59
57 51 #31 Ryan McGuire So Connecticut 25:07.5 3:09 5:04 5,500m: 17:05
58 52 #73 Patrick Maag Jr Marquette 25:08.0 3:09 5:04 5,500m: 17:00
59 53 #58 Evan Hibbs Jr Louisville 25:09.9 3:09 5:04 5,500m: 17:12
60 -- #102 Liam Hillery Fr Providence 25:10.3 3:09 5:04 5,500m: 17:00
61 54 #10 Ethan Baum So Cincinnati 25:10.8 3:09 5:04 5,500m: 17:01
62 55 #28 Scott Johnson Sr Connecticut 25:13.1 3:10 5:05 5,500m: 17:03
63 56 #16 Kevin Fink So Cincinnati 25:16.4 3:10 5:05 5,500m: 17:04
64 -- #81 Jeff MacMillan Jr Notre Dame 25:20.4 3:10 5:06 5,500m: 17:02
65 -- #47 Omar Kaddurah Fr Georgetown 25:21.6 3:11 5:06 5,500m: 16:53
66 57 #11 Chase Beckmann Jr Cincinnati 25:23.6 3:11 5:07 5,500m: 17:15
67 -- #158 John Pickhaver Jr Villanova 25:23.9 3:11 5:07 5,500m: 17:07
68 58 #67 Anthony Gedwill Jr Marquette 25:29.2 3:12 5:08 5,500m: 17:14
69 -- #75 Chris Spudic Fr Marquette 25:40.4 3:13 5:10 5,500m: 17:23
70 59 #20 Tyler Ross So Cincinnati 25:43.8 3:13 5:11 5,500m: 17:29
71 60 #131 Connor Bauer So South Florid 25:45.3 3:14 5:11 5,500m: 17:29
72 61 #13 Matt Collmar Sr Cincinnati 25:45.7 3:14 5:11 5,500m: 17:27
73 62 #30 Jordan Magath Jr Connecticut 25:51.4 3:14 5:12 5,500m: 17:30
74 63 #39 Chris Miedema So DePaul 25:52.7 3:14 5:13 5,500m: 17:34
75 64 #37 Zak Koronkiewicz Jr DePaul 25:53.7 3:15 5:13 5,500m: 17:35
76 -- #57 Ryan Eaton So Louisville 25:55.2 3:15 5:13 5,500m: 17:28
77 65 #27 Charles Fowler Fr Connecticut 26:03.3 3:16 5:15 5,500m: 17:39
78 66 #109 Chris Banafato So Rutgers 26:05.6 3:16 5:15 5,500m: 17:35
79 67 #24 Tim Bennatan Jr Connecticut 26:07.9 3:16 5:16 5,500m: 17:43
80 -- #21 Greg Sanders Fr Cincinnati 26:08.4 3:16 5:16 5,500m: 17:41
81 68 #88 Rich Addison So Pittsburgh 26:11.3 3:17 5:16 5,500m: 17:41
82 69 #41 Tyler Schmitt Jr DePaul 26:14.8 3:17 5:17 5,500m: 17:44
83 -- #18 Eric Hauser So Cincinnati 26:18.5 3:18 5:18 5,500m: 17:43
84 70 #137 Lucas Simari Sr South Florid 26:21.6 3:18 5:19 5,500m: 17:53
85 71 #112 Chris DeFabio Fr Rutgers 26:22.0 3:18 5:19 5,500m: 18:00
86 72 #117 Casey Weiss Jr Rutgers 26:23.7 3:18 5:19 5,500m: 18:00
87 73 #33 Herald Alvarez So DePaul 26:26.0 3:19 5:19 5,500m: 17:57
88 74 #121 Jared Hanko Jr Seton Hall 26:27.3 3:19 5:20 5,500m: 17:56
89 75 #116 Curtis Richburg So Rutgers 26:29.4 3:19 5:20 5,500m: 17:57
90 76 #94 Ben Kisley So Pittsburgh 26:31.8 3:19 5:21 5,500m: 17:52
91 77 #113 Ben Forrest Sr Rutgers 26:33.1 3:20 5:21 5,500m: 17:59
92 78 #40 Ian Sanchez So DePaul 26:33.7 3:20 5:21 5,500m: 17:51
93 79 #34 Dennis Baliga Sr DePaul 26:37.3 3:20 5:22 5,500m: 18:00
94 -- #62 Paul Stewart Fr Louisville 26:37.5 3:20 5:22 5,500m: 17:51
95 80 #93 Kevin Hull Jr Pittsburgh 26:52.8 3:22 5:25 5,500m: 18:16
96 81 #89 Andrew Cerrito Jr Pittsburgh 26:54.3 3:22 5:25 5,500m: 17:33
97 82 #23 Alex Bennatan Jr Connecticut 26:54.5 3:22 5:25 5,500m: 18:09
98 83 #133 Steven Fernandez So South Florid 26:59.5 3:23 5:26 5,500m: 18:17
99 -- #15 Rob Flannigan Fr Cincinnati 26:59.8 3:23 5:26 5,500m:
100 -- #25 Joe Clark Jr Connecticut 27:01.8 3:23 5:27 5,500m: 18:13
101 84 #119 Erik Chester Sr Seton Hall 27:02.6 3:23 5:27 5,500m: 18:15
102 -- #64 Spencer Agnew So Marquette 27:04.8 3:23 5:27 5,500m: 18:17
103 -- #35 Max Clink Jr DePaul 27:05.4 3:24 5:27 5,500m: 18:22
104 -- #26 Michael Duprey Fr Connecticut 27:16.4 3:25 5:30 5,500m: 18:20
105 85 #96 Wesley Washington Jr Pittsburgh 27:17.5 3:25 5:30 5,500m: 18:06
106 86 #132 Jon Bing Sr South Florid 27:19.6 3:25 5:30 5,500m: 18:36
107 87 #110 Thomas Bragen So Rutgers 27:21.5 3:26 5:31 5,500m: 18:28
108 88 #90 Dontave Cowsette Sr Pittsburgh 27:25.7 3:26 5:31 5,500m: 18:30
109 89 #135 Jeff Lipsman Fr South Florid 27:33.1 3:27 5:33 5,500m: 18:41
110 90 #126 Tyler Orner Fr Seton Hall 27:37.2 3:28 5:34 5,500m: 18:42
111 91 #115 Anthony Horten Fr Rutgers 27:41.2 3:28 5:35 5,500m: 18:48
112 92 #138 Felix Soto Jr South Florid 27:47.5 3:29 5:36 5,500m: 18:43
113 -- #118 Brian Wells Fr Rutgers 27:47.9 3:29 5:36 5,500m: 18:46
114 -- #111 Steve Burkholder So Rutgers 27:55.0 3:30 5:37 5,500m: 18:30
115 93 #95 Luke Swomley So Pittsburgh 28:22.1 3:33 5:43 5,500m: 19:17
116 94 #130 Kevin Walsh Fr Seton Hall 28:22.4 3:33 5:43 5,500m: 19:05
117 -- #92 Benjamin Hatch Sr Pittsburgh 28:39.2 3:35 5:43 5,500m: 19:18
118 95 #125 Andrew O'Leary Jr Seton Hall 28:46.6 3:36 5:48 5,500m: 19:35
119 96 #120 Tony Cramond Jr Seton Hall 28:49.5 3:37 5:48 5,500m: 19:37
120 97 #122 Cory Hellwig Jr Seton Hall 29:03.1 3:38 5:51 5,500m: 19:35
121 -- #129 John Walsh Fr Seton Hall 29:14.4 3:40 5:53 5,500m: 19:39
122 98 #136 Amuru Serikyaku Fr South Florid 29:58.3 3:45 6:02 5,500m: 19:02
123 -- #124 Carl Johnston So Seton Hall 30:10.7 3:47 6:05 5,500m: 19:47

Friday, October 28, 2011

USATF Spotlight: Bobby Curtis


Athlete Spotlight - Bobby Curtis
10/28/2011

When Bobby Curtis steps to the starting line at next weekend’s ING New York City Marathon, it will mark a long progression in his running career. There will be points during the race he wonders how he even got there.

There was a time when competing in a marathon, which Curtis will do for the first time next Saturday, wasn’t even an option and no way he thought 129 miles in one week were possible. He will think back on how times have changed.

“Four years ago I thought that 90 minutes was a long run,” Curtis said in an interview from Mammoth Lakes, Calif., where he has been training. “Now two and a half hours is a long run. The distance has changed drastically and my perception has changed. I’m doing things now that seemed out of reach before. Things you didn’t think were possible.”

Regardless of the path he took, Curtis will join the likes of fellow elite runners Ed Moran, Lauren Fleshman and Molly Pritz who will all be making their marathon debuts in New York. The reasons for choosing to run a fall marathon all came down to timing for Curtis.

“I’m about at that age when you have to decide if you are going to run one,” the 26-year-old said of his marathon debut. “The time is right.”

Curtis was quick to point out the decision to run next weekend in New York does not change his mindset or goals for the coming year. He ran the second fastest 10,000-meter time by an American in 2011 of 27:24.67. His goals are to represent Team USA at the 2012 Olympic Games in the 10,000m instead of the marathon.

Ironically, his 2011 performance in the 10,000m also played a role in Curtis electing to run in the New York City Marathon. It was following his fourth place finish at the latest USA Outdoor Championships when, after missing a spot on the squad for the World Outdoor Championships, he began talk of a fall marathon.

“It just worked out time-wise,” he said. “Running New York allowed me time to recover from the track season. It’s right before the (Olympic Marathon) Trials so not many of the top Americans will be focused on a fall marathon, which leaves it a bit open.

“Outside of the Olympics, the New York City Marathon is one of the biggest in the sport. You really can’t beat it.”

While committed to the 10,000m on the track, there always stands the possibility of a breakout performance in the marathon. A performance good enough to make Curtis seriously consider running the Olympic Trials Marathon January 14 in Houston.

“Never say never I guess,” Curtis said with a laugh. “If I run 2:09 it would be almost foolish not to run the Trials. But I don’t want to get too far ahead of myself.”


With taking on anything for the first time comes a great deal of anxiety. There are numerous small issues that can arise through the duration of a 26.2-mile race. Curtis has sought the advice of 2004 Olympic marathon silver medalist Meb Keflezighi, 50 km American record holder Josh Cox and Mammoth Track Club coach Terrence Mahon to help in his preparation. Keflezighi will also be competing in the New York City Marathon and is the 2009 winner of the race.

“There is definitely some anxiety,” Curtis admitted. “Since I have been doing so well in training I don’t want something small to go wrong. This is uncharted territory. The anxiety is about something small.”

It was the progression to his first marathon that Curtis felt years ago would never be a possibility. Considering his path, it raises the question if the next step in his running career will be an ultra-marathon.

“Not a chance,” Curtis quickly concluded.

Jared Slinde
Communications Manager
USA Track & Field

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Curtis at Two Weeks Out: Hard Work is Done



2 Weeks Out: Hay is in the Barn
Bobby Curtis on October 26, 2011, 12:51pm FloTrack.org

Hay is in the Barn

Well, all the hard work is done. My final big week of training in Mammoth Lakes went smoothly. For the week I hit a mildly impressive 110 miles with two 20+ days. Now I guess is the time to rest up, and focus on all the small details that can make or break a marathon on race day. I’m confident in my fueling strategy, carbohydrate loading plan and pacing expectations; however, I’m unsure of my facial hair choice or if I’ll go with sunglasses or without…good thing I have a few days!

Detailed Training

Monday: 7500ft. 9 miles AM run at around 6:30 pace, 6 miles in the PM run at 7:00 pace

Tuesday: 7300ft. 23.75 miles in the AM. Started off at 6:20 pace and worked my way into a tad under 6 minutes the last 5 miles. Last pure long run of the cycle, yay!

Wednesday: 7300ft. 7 miles in the AM at 7:00 pace, 5 miles in the PM at 7:00 pace

Thursday: 7300ft. 7 miles in the AM at 7:00 pace, 6 miles in the PM at 7:00 pace

Friday: 7200ft. 10x400 in the off 90 seconds in the AM. I ran these reps on Green Church Rd. Slightly downhill reps were 61-63, slightly uphill reps were 63-64, warm up/down. 7 miles PM very slow.

Saturday: 7200ft. Easy 9 miles in the AM run at 6:40 pace

Sunday: 7300 ft. 3 mile warm up. 18 mile fartlek, worked like this…2 miles easy (6:30 pace) straight into 14 miles of continuously repeating 4 minutes at marathon pace (5:00 pace) 5 minutes easy (6:30 pace) 2 minutes at half marathon pace (4:45 pace) 5 minutes easy (6:30 pace) 1 minute at 10k pace (4:20 pace) 5 minutes easy (6:30 pace). Finished with two miles easy (6:30 pace). Total time 1:40:54. HR and splits:



Mile Splits: 6:00, 5:55, 5:12, 5:18, 5:34, 5:28, 5;07, 5:23, 5:38, 5:26, 5:13, 5:32, 5:31, 5:41, 6:03, 5:25, 5:56, 6:25

Monday, October 24, 2011

Dan Lewis Helps NYAC Men Win Boston Mayor's Cup XC Title



Dan Lewis (bib 632 above, running with Carl Mackenzie at the 2008 Big East meet) finished 16th overall and was the New York Athletic Club's 5th scorer as the NYAC men won the 22nd Annual Mayor's Cup Cross Country championship at Boston's Franklin Park on Sunday. Lewis covered the 8K course in 24:33 (4:58 pace). Here's the top 50 individual finishers, as well as the top 5 teams:


22nd Annual Mayor's Cup
Presented by the B.A.A. and adidas
Men's Championship
Oct. 23, 2011 8 Kilometers Franklin Park, Boston, MA
Timing by Granite State Race Services www.gsrs.com (see our Calendar of Races)
Send corrections to: bt@gsrs.com
==================================================================================
Place Div/Tot Div Time Pace Name Age Sex
===== ======== ===== ======= ===== ====================== === === ===== ==========
1 1/176 M0139 23:46 4:49 David Nightingale M
2 2/176 M0139 23:48 4:49 Jeff Schirmer 24
3 3/176 M0139 23:48 4:49 Steve Hallinan 25 M
4 4/176 M0139 23:48 4:49 Harbert Okuti 25 M
5 5/176 M0139 23:49 4:50 Dan Chenoweth 22 M
6 6/176 M0139 23:51 4:50 Timothy Ritchie 24 M
7 7/176 M0139 23:56 4:51 Ruben Sanca 24 M
8 8/176 M0139 24:09 4:54 Christopher Zablocki 23 M
9 9/176 M0139 24:10 4:54 Thomas Robbins 22 M
10 10/176 M0139 24:14 4:55 Kurt Willaims 24 M
11 11/176 M0139 24:20 4:56 Gian-Paul Caccia M
12 12/176 M0139 24:20 4:56 Brian Harvey 24 M
13 13/176 M0139 24:23 4:56 Matthew Forys M
14 14/176 M0139 24:23 4:56 Jon Phillips M
15 15/176 M0139 24:30 4:58 Andrew Combs 27 M
16 16/176 M0139 24:33 4:58 Daniel Lewis M
17 17/176 M0139 24:35 4:59 Andrea Sorgato 30 M
18 18/176 M0139 24:35 4:59 Jake Byrne 19 M
19 19/176 M0139 24:37 4:59 Dave Bishop 23 M
20 20/176 M0139 24:40 5:00 Andrew Kowalsky 19 M
21 21/176 M0139 24:44 5:01 Dan Hocking 32 M
22 22/176 M0139 24:45 5:01 Brian Gagnon 24 M
23 23/176 M0139 24:48 5:01 Colby Delbene 21 M
24 24/176 M0139 24:49 5:02 Philip Mitchell 24 M
25 25/176 M0139 24:51 5:02 Brian Lang 22 M
26 26/176 M0139 24:51 5:02 Eric Ashe 23 M
27 27/176 M0139 24:55 5:03 Jeff Brannigan 22 M
28 28/176 M0139 24:58 5:03 Kyle Murray 24 M
29 29/176 M0139 25:00 5:04 Ben Massam 23 M
30 30/176 M0139 25:00 5:04 Michael O'Dowd 18 M
31 31/176 M0139 25:01 5:04 Justin Wager 23 M
32 32/176 M0139 25:01 5:04 Alex Gomes 21 M
33 33/176 M0139 25:04 5:05 Daniel Barry 24 M
34 34/176 M0139 25:05 5:05 Connor Shelley M
35 35/176 M0139 25:06 5:05 Dan Murner 24 M
36 36/176 M0139 25:08 5:05 John Kenworthy 24 M
37 37/176 M0139 25:15 5:07 Christopher Spooner 26 M
38 38/176 M0139 25:17 5:07 Will Viviani 29 M
39 39/176 M0139 25:21 5:08 Mike Danaher 20 M
40 40/176 M0139 25:21 5:08 Colman Hatton 23 M
41 41/176 M0139 25:21 5:08 Jon Pierce 23 M
42 42/176 M0139 25:22 5:08 Dylan Summers 22 M
43 43/176 M0139 25:23 5:08 Matthew Lacey 27 M
44 44/176 M0139 25:24 5:09 Paul Norton 22 M
45 45/176 M0139 25:25 5:09 Geoff Nelson 26 M
46 46/176 M0139 25:26 5:09 David Emerson 24 M
47 47/176 M0139 25:30 5:10 Brad Mish 24 M
48 48/176 M0139 25:33 5:11 Brendan Prindiville 34 M
49 49/176 M0139 25:35 5:11 Will Geoghegan 19 M
50 50/176 M0139 25:35 5:11 Braxton Jackson 23 M


Top Teams
1. NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB
1 8 10 11 13 (24) (42) = 43
David Nightingale, Gian-Paul Caccia, Matthew Forys, Jon Phillips,
Daniel Lewis, Connor Shelley, Bobby Hartnett

2. BOSTON ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
5 9 18 30 36 (37) (38) = 98
Timothy Ritchie, Brian Harvey, Eric Ashe, Colman Hatton, David Emerson,
Brad Mish, Brendan Prindiville

3. NEW BALANCE BOSTON
14 15 20 25 34 (40) (52) = 108
Andrea Sorgato, Dan Hocking, Kyle Murray, Dan Murner, Paul Norton,
Braxton Jackson, Erik Nedeau

4. CENTRAL PARK TC NEW BALANCE
12 26 27 33 46 (55) (63) = 144
Andrew Combs, John Kenworthy, Christopher Spooner, Matthew Lacey,
Carlos Jamieson, Jonevan Hornsby, Stan Berkow

5. DARTMOUTH COLLEGE
29 32 39 44 48 (53) (57) = 192
Mike Danaher, Dylan Summers, Will Geoghegan, Matthew Pierce, Silas
Talbot, Jack Terwilliger, Luke Decker

Sunday, October 23, 2011

After 6 Year Absence, Jen Rhines Is Back in the 26.2 Business


From Runner's World Racing News, October 21, 2011

For Jen Rhines, there was a time not so long ago when she thought she was done with the marathon, despite making the U.S. Olympic team at the distance in 2004. The 37-year-old, who trains with the Mammoth Track Club in Mammoth Lakes, CA, went back to the track after her last marathon in 2006 and earned a spot on the 2008 Olympic squad at 5000 meters, making it hard to argue with her decision. So, there was much surprise when she decided to run the ING New York City Marathon this year. Rhines said this week that her training has left her both excited and confident about re-tackling the distance.

"For a few years, long runs had become very difficult for me and it left me with no desire to race for over 26 miles!" Rhines wrote earlier this week in an e-mail. "However, last winter [training for the Chevron Houston Half-Marathon, which she won in a personal best 1:11:14] was a turning point for me and I've been getting stronger ever since."

Rhines competed in late August at 10,000 meters in the IAAF World Championships, placing ninth, then jumped right into training for the marathon. "The transition from peaking for World Champs into training for New York went more smoothly than I thought it might," she says, adding that she hasn't raced since Daegu. "I've done a lot of quality training in a relatively short amount of time," she explained, adding that she's heading down from the altitude of Mammoth to San Diego this weekend to put on the finishing touches before heading to New York. "As someone who's struggled in more than one marathon I think I understand what I'm getting myself into and I've left no stone unturned in my preparation for New York this year."

What's next after New York? A well-deserved post-race trip to Maui with her husband and coach [and former Villanova All-American -- BC], Terrence Mahon.

Interview with Nic Bideau -- Mentor to Blincoe & Curtis
(and Husband of Sonia O'Sullivan)


Here's a fresh interview from the Runner's Tribe with Aussie Nic Bideau, who coaches both Bobby Curtis and Adrian Blincoe.


RT Interview: Catch up with Nic Bideau
posted by rtross on October 19, 2011, 10:56pm

RT: Nic, thanks for your time. It was an up and down year overseas for your athletes. Let’s start with Jeff Riseley. He failed in Daegu over 1500m yet stunned us in Rieti over 800m. What are your thoughts for him come the London Olympics in terms of what event he has the best shot at?

NB: That’s really up to Jeff to decide. He is qualified in both but it will be his decision as to which event he focuses on at the trial. I haven’t got around to talking about that with Jeff yet. I am more concerned with him getting fit again and improving on the areas that let us down in 2011 before I worry about which event he does. Whichever event he decides on won’t affect his training over the next few months so there is still a lot of time for that to unfold.

RT: Moving onto Zoe Buckman. She came on strong and was unlucky to miss the team for Daegu. Do you think the selectors should have made room for her?

NB: Well if she does make the team to London we’ll be sending an athlete that has had no experience at a global major championship as a result of not sending her to Daegu. I think there is so much for our athletes to learn about racing in championship conditions against the very best that we are foolish not to take the opportunity to give an emerging athletes such as Zoe experience in that situation ahead of the main event – the Olympics.

RT: Likewise, Lachlan Renshaw. He had a B-qualifer but was left at home. Australia ended up having no starters for the men’s 800m, when the selectors could have easily placed Renshaw in the line-up. Do you see any point in not selecting athletes like Renshaw or Buckman for such teams?

NB: I think the IAAF make the rules as to which athletes they will accept entries for. I don’t see why we need to place the bar higher than the IAAF set it at. We don’t make our tracks longer down here do we! If we want to encourage people to put their lives on hold to pursue this sport we should be selecting them if we can.

RT: Another of your chargers, Kaila McKnight, had a great year, lowering her personal best over 1500m to 4:05 and making the semi in Daegu for the 1500m. Do you think Kaila can take that next step in-between now and London to hopefully see her in that final?

NB: I don’t think Kaila has finished improving. Kaila had a very good year but I can still see areas where she can improve. Hopefully she can take another step forward in 2012.

RT: Ryan Gregson has had more than a few injury concerns. Are you confident that he has put these behind him now?

NB: Let’s hope so. We’ve certainly taken plenty of measures to try and ensure he can put his injury concerns behind him. Hopefully he’ll get a good run from now and put the training weeks together and give himself a real shot and competing with the very best next year.

RT: Ryan stated in an interview with us last week that he wants to build his mileage to around the 220 km per week mark once his biomechanics problems have been resolved. Was he taking the piss here or is that a realistic goal?

NB: He was exaggerating. Ryan would never do more than 210km in a week!

RT: Was Ben St Lawrence’s 10,000m Australian record the highlight of the year for you?

NB: That was a great race as both he and Bobby Curtis who had been training together beat a lot of quality runners. It was a good night as Eloise also qualified there. But 2011 was always about trying to get as many people qualified for London as we could. All up counting Bobby Curtis (USA) and Adrian Blincoe (NZ) there are 9 people in my group with the A standard this year. I had hoped at least 3 more would have done that by now so they could all be going into the Olympic year without having to worry about chasing that and focus more on preparing for the Games. But with that as the main target for 2011, every time an athlete ran the A standard was a highlight.

RT: A lot gets discussed/argued amongst athletes and coaches around the country about just how much speed work your athletes do. Can you provide details on how you build speed up in guys like Riseley and Gregson whilst maintaining their aerobic engines?



NB: Well they are naturally quite fast guys and they remain fast by running fast regularly. There is nothing about building aerobic endurance that erodes speed. Mo looked pretty quick in the last lap in Daegu didn’t he? People lose their speed if they don’t practice it. So while we focus heavily on building aerobic endurance, the athletes also regularly work on their speed by running fast.

RT: What do you think about the new world record rule for women’s road running?

NB: I think there are plenty other women world records that have been aided by much more than male pacemakers that we should be cleaning up first.

RT: Up and comers to watch out for?

NB: Jordy Williamsz can improve a lot in 2012 and Brett Robinson will be going quietly as he does but he will also run a lot better next year. I also hope a couple of the super talents we have known about for a while can stay healthy next year and start to string some performances together – people like Alex Rowe and Emily Brichacek.

Saturday, October 22, 2011

Ariann Neutts Top Collegian at Haverford Invitational


Ariann Neutts was the top collegiate runner at Friday's Haverford Invitational. Neutts led a 6-person Villanova contingent, with five of the six finishing in the top 10 overall. Former Villanova All-American Ali Smith was the overall winner, covering the 3-mile course in 16:51 (5:37 pace).

Villanova                          (2010)
2. Ariann Neutts 17:30
3. Meghan Smith 17:46 (18:16)
5. Mary Bohi 18:31
7. Shannon Browne 18:35 (18:03)
9. Amanda Borroughs 18:44
19. Anna Francis 19:25


Women 3 Mile Run CC
Comp# Name School Time
====================================================================================
1 516 Smith, Ali Unattached 16:51
2 546 Neutts, Ariann Villanova University 17:30
3 545 Smith, Meghan Villanova University 17:46
4 336 Klinges, Katherine Gwynedd Mercy College 18:15
5 542 Bohi, Mary Villanova University 18:31
6 417 Adams, Cynthia Lebanon Valley College 18:34
7 543 Browne, Shannon Villanova University 18:35
8 371 Morgan, Mary Haverford College 18:42
9 515 Borroughs, Amanda Unattached 18:44
10 367 Lellman, Charlotte Haverford College 18:44
11 361 Balmer, Katie Haverford College 18:57
12 569 Johnson, Liz The College of New Jersey 19:06
13 375 Shank, Kaitlyn Haverford College 19:07
14 488 Manzo, Jillian The College of New Jersey 19:10
15 373 Quay de La Valle, Molly Haverford College 19:17
16 362 Croucher, Jamie Haverford College 19:20
17 489 Nealon, Tara The College of New Jersey 19:22
18 338 Matticola, Erica Gwynedd Mercy College 19:23
19 544 Francis, Anna Villanova University 19:25
20 335 Dalton, Colleen Gwynedd Mercy College 19:26
21 432 Stockdale, Dana Lebanon Valley College 19:30
22 376 Thorsheim, Chelsea Haverford College 19:33
23 372 Potter, Rachael Haverford College 19:34
24 364 Einstein, Lily Haverford College 19:36
25 377 Uddin, Olivia Haverford College 19:37
26 347 Sellman, Regina Gwynedd Mercy College 19:42
27 366 Keifer, Cara Haverford College 19:42
28 487 Kocher, Meghan The College of New Jersey 19:47
29 484 Elliott, Johanna The College of New Jersey 19:49
30 334 Creighton, Emily Gwynedd Mercy College 19:53
31 368 Letner, Dorothea Haverford College 19:58
32 340 McGarrity, Holly Gwynedd Mercy College 20:07
33 495 Wallach, Abbey The College of New Jersey 20:11
34 424 Frederick, Tiffany Lebanon Valley College 20:16
35 316 Chung, Elsie Bryn Mawr College 20:24
36 421 Broderick, Victoria Lebanon Valley College 20:25
37 493 Silver, Alyssa The College of New Jersey 20:29
38 374 Riffenburgh, Kelly Haverford College 20:31
39 444 Chila, Christina Philadelphia University 20:34
40 339 McCloskey, Danielle Gwynedd Mercy College 20:43
41 333 Clavin, Kelly Gwynedd Mercy College 20:49
42 418 Anderson, Kate Lebanon Valley College 20:50
43 485 Grosskurth, Erin The College of New Jersey 20:53
44 318 Kosarek, Cassie Bryn Mawr College 20:54
45 425 Keich, Alyssa Lebanon Valley College 20:58
46 369 Meehan, Ivan Haverford College 21:14
47 342 Reh, Carissa Gwynedd Mercy College 21:24
48 337 Manzi, Lauren Gwynedd Mercy College 21:26
49 445 Ford, Meghan Philadelphia University 21:30
50 422 Eroh, Brianna Lebanon Valley College 21:30
51 458 Naiman, Thera Swarthmore College 21:32
52 341 Miller, Heather Gwynedd Mercy College 21:32
53 365 Kantor, Rachael Haverford College 21:40
54 315 Bell, Emily Bryn Mawr College 21:40
55 430 Shay, Amber Lebanon Valley College 21:48
56 370 Minden, Molly Haverford College 22:00
57 332 Arbizo, Kaitlyn Gwynedd Mercy College 22:18
58 319 Melker, Anna Bryn Mawr College 22:38
59 428 Robinson, Kelsey Lebanon Valley College 23:02
60 360 Allan, Nina Haverford College 23:17
61 363 Duffy, Margaret Haverford College 23:23
62 429 Samper, Jamielyn Lebanon Valley College 23:41
63 328 Kuebler, Tori Cedar Crest College 23:43
64 322 Travis, Victoria Bryn Mawr College 23:44
65 446 Vanleer, Kaitlin Philadelphia University 23:47
66 327 Gray, Alicia Cedar Crest College 23:51
67 345 Scheer, Alexandra Gwynedd Mercy College 23:52
68 326 Colangelo, Joellyn Cedar Crest College 24:31
69 346 Schneider, Amy Gwynedd Mercy College 24:37
70 329 Moody, Heather Cedar Crest College 24:40
71 325 Bossard, Courtney Cedar Crest College 24:41
72 344 Rudich, Simone Gwynedd Mercy College 24:44
73 321 Schmidt, Elaine Bryn Mawr College 24:57
74 331 Smith, Fatima Cedar Crest College 25:21
75 330 Oswald, Kaitlin Cedar Crest College 26:23
76 317 Grimes, Kelsey Bryn Mawr College 27:52
77 324 Zacarias, Allison Bryn Mawr College 28:24

Friday, October 21, 2011

Alex Tully, Nova Men Dominate Haverford Invitational

Fifteen Villanova harriers competed at the nearby Haverford Invitational on Friday. Alex Tully from Little Rock, Arkansas won the event by 9 seconds in 19:45 (4:56 pace) over the 4 miles course and 110 competitors. The Villanova men took 8 of the top 10 spots. The times compare well to the team's performance at last year's meet, where no Villanova runner broke 20:00 (Matt Gibney won in 2010 in 20:06). Here are the Villanova results, and the complete results:




Villanova                       (2010)
1. Alex Tully 19:45
2. Rob Denault 19:54
3. Brian Basili 19:56
4. Joe LoRusso 19:56
6. Tom Trainer 20:09
8. Brian Tetreault 20:16 (20:20)
9. Dusty Solis 20:23 (20:44)
10. Rob Hurlbut 20:26
15. Chris Pietrocarlo 20:31 (20:35)
17. Phil O'Connell 20:36 (21:16)
20. Chris FitzSimons 20:53
22. Dan Norman 20:54
25. Charlie Bates 20:59
35. Joe Capecci 21:15 (21:58)
36. Richie Bohny 21:15



Men 4 Mile Run CC
Comp# Name School Time
===================================================================================
1 558 Tully, Alex Villanova University 19:45.00
2 518 Denault, Robert Unattached 19:54.00
3 547 Basili, Brian Villanova University 19:56.00
4 551 Lorusso, Joseph Villanova University 20:02.00
5 522 Johnson, Brent Unattached 20:08.00
6 526 Trainer, Thomas Unattached 20:09.00
7 351 Kubiak, Brett Gwynedd Mercy College 20:15.00
8 557 Tetreault, Brian Villanova University 20:16.00
9 556 Solis, Dusty Villanova University 20:23.00
10 521 Hurlbut, Robert Unattached 20:26.00
11 358 VanDenHengel, Matt Gwynedd Mercy College 20:26.00
12 387 Duncan, Jeff Haverford College 20:28.00
13 391 Haswell, Ethan Haverford College 20:29.00
14 352 Kubiak, Joe Gwynedd Mercy College 20:30.00
15 555 Pietrocarlo, Chris Villanova University 20:31.00
16 380 Bregman, Avi Haverford College 20:32.00
17 553 O'Connell, Phil Villanova University 20:36.00
18 382 Christian, Joel Haverford College 20:36.00
19 389 Golato, Andrew Haverford College 20:49.00
20 550 FitzSimons, Chris Villanova University 20:53.00
21 568 Watts, John Unattached 20:53.00
22 552 Norman, Dan Villanova University 20:54.00
23 405 Riccio, Michael Haverford College 20:56.00
24 434 Bonds, Eliott Lebanon Valley College 20:58.00
25 517 Bates, Charlie Unattached 20:59.00
26 509 Nihen, Rob The College of New Jersey 21:02.00
27 384 Colletta, Dave Haverford College 21:02.00
28 563 Garrity, Chris Widener University 21:03.00
29 496 Arnold, John The College of New Jersey 21:04.00
30 397 McNeilly, Jack Haverford College 21:05.00
31 409 Siqueiros, Ben Haverford College 21:06.00
32 519 Furrey, Michael Unattached 21:10.00
33 437 Goelz, Andrew Lebanon Valley College 21:10.00
34 386 Cutilli, Ben Haverford College 21:10.00
35 549 Capecci, Joe Villanova University 21:15.00
36 548 Bohny, Richie Villanova University 21:15.00
37 354 Rooke, Tyler Gwynedd Mercy College 21:18.00
38 404 Rasmussen, Soren Haverford College 21:22.00
39 390 Haneman, Pat Haverford College 21:24.00
40 438 Harnish, Michael Lebanon Valley College 21:24.00
41 394 Koffer, Jake Haverford College 21:25.00
42 512 Ure, Ryan The College of New Jersey 21:32.00
43 353 Rogers, James Gwynedd Mercy College 21:34.00
44 350 Joniec, Joe Gwynedd Mercy College 21:35.00
45 395 Krause, Greg Haverford College 21:37.00
46 435 D'Angelo, Nick Lebanon Valley College 21:47.00
47 383 Cohen, Matt Haverford College 21:50.00
48 381 Buikema, Aaron Haverford College 21:54.00
49 497 Berti, Mike The College of New Jersey 21:55.00
50 508 Matteson, Alex The College of New Jersey 22:00.00
51 510 O'Dowd, Kevin The College of New Jersey 22:02.00
52 507 Lynch, Dylan The College of New Jersey 22:08.00
53 402 Olshansky, Jacob Haverford College 22:14.00
54 505 Jones, Mike The College of New Jersey 22:16.00
55 396 Marsico, David Haverford College 22:16.00
56 398 Mendelsohn, Richard Haverford College 22:17.00
57 498 Boyle, Ian The College of New Jersey 22:21.00
58 561 Caporale, Jason Widener University 22:22.00
59 477 Schug, Jorin Swarthmore College 22:26.00
60 482 White, Erick Swarthmore College 22:28.00
61 406 Roza, David Haverford College 22:29.00
62 359 Ziegler, Mark Gwynedd Mercy College 22:30.00
63 562 Decker, Dylan Widener University 22:32.00
64 440 Lincoln-Decusatis, Gabriel Lebanon Valley College 22:40.00
65 513 Waite, Pat The College of New Jersey 22:43.00
66 559 Brogan, Kyle Widener University 22:44.00
67 565 Shaddock, Kevin Widener University 22:44.00
68 379 Barrett, Graham Haverford College 22:48.00
69 356 Somers, Tyler Gwynedd Mercy College 22:52.00
70 566 Simpson, Terry Widener University 22:56.00
71 514 Wilson, Andrew The College of New Jersey 23:01.00
72 412 Stackman, Daniel Haverford College 23:03.00
73 443 Tierney, Patrick Lebanon Valley College 23:04.00
74 506 Laster, Chase The College of New Jersey 23:09.00
75 355 Smart, John Gwynedd Mercy College 23:13.00
76 462 Ainley, Henry Swarthmore College 23:15.00
77 527 Vechik, Nick Unattached 23:19.00
78 520 Hausmann, Tommy Unattached 23:21.00
79 401 Olsen, Gabe Haverford College 23:32.00
80 447 Duvally, Mike Philadelphia University 23:34.00
81 525 Rudd, Nick Unattached 23:37.00
82 415 Van Meter, Lucas Haverford College 23:38.00
83 567 Reynolds, Nick Unattached 23:53.00
84 403 Priver, Kyle Haverford College 23:57.00
85 436 Garraway, Mark Lebanon Valley College 24:14.00
86 564 Jasper, Jihad Widener University 24:17.00
87 560 Calkins, Michael Widener University 24:18.00
88 449 Pena, Rich Philadelphia University 24:19.00
89 357 Tranchitella, Mike Gwynedd Mercy College 24:22.00
90 433 Black, Chris Lebanon Valley College 24:29.00
91 441 Riley, Jonathan Lebanon Valley College 24:29.00
92 385 Curry, John Haverford College 24:51.00
93 483 Witchey, Nick Swarthmore College 24:58.00
94 481 Verhasselt, Eric Swarthmore College 25:04.00
95 400 Odadele, Tolu Haverford College 25:15.00
96 349 DiGioacchino, Nick Gwynedd Mercy College 25:22.00
97 442 Talarico, Alex Lebanon Valley College 25:23.00
98 476 Schorsch, Emanuel Swarthmore College 25:34.00
99 392 Hoffman, Kevin Haverford College 25:35.00
100 388 Garbor, Zach Haverford College 25:51.00
101 523 Kelly, Thomas Unattached 26:03.00
102 439 Hoose, Courtland Lebanon Valley College 26:58.00
103 536 Bawtinheimer, Steven Valley Forge Christian Co 26:59.00
104 416 Williams, Marcus Haverford College 27:59.00
105 538 Cauley, Thomas Valley Forge Christian Co 28:20.00
106 540 Rogers, Amir Valley Forge Christian Co 29:32.00
107 448 Palumbo, Kurt Philadelphia University 30:25.00
108 541 Vasquez, Robert Valley Forge Christian Co 30:28.00
109 539 Fleming, Major Valley Forge Christian Co 30:44.00
110 537 Billings, Aaron Valley Forge Christian Co 32:51.00

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Beyond the Stats: Bobby Curtis
Wednesday, 19 October 2011 13:08
Written by David Powell
NYRR Media

One Monday night in 2004, when Bobby Curtis was a 19-year-old runner at Villanova University, he was unable to sleep. So he went to bed early the next night, but still no sleep. Or the next night. "Within two or three days I was a wreck with school, my social life, and running," he recalls. He was forced to withdraw from an indoor track meet in New York that weekend as he continued to experience what he describes as "acute, horrible, horrendous insomnia."

It went on for three months, eased off, then overpowered him again. "I went through the wringer as far as seeing doctors and experimenting with different medications," he says. "Then my coach, Marcus O'Sullivan—who's still my coach today—said I should take a break, so I ended up taking off spring semester of my sophomore year."

Curtis tried everything: sleep hygiene, sleep scheduling, even getting drunk. "I don't want anyone to paint me as a desperate alcoholic, but I did that one night—and I was not only hung over the next day but it didn't help me sleep," he says.

From 2005 to 2008, Curtis followed a discipline of sleep hygiene and sleep scheduling. "One important thing in the manual of sleep hygiene is to get out of bed if you can't sleep. With sleep scheduling, you give yourself less time in bed than you require, so you sleep better because fatigue builds up," he explains.

Having returned to running, telling himself not to be upset if he was unable to train intensely, Curtis started setting personal records. In 2007, he ran his first sub 4-minute mile, and in 2008, he won the NCAA 5000 meters.


"My sleep was pretty good at that stage," says Curtis. But in March 2009, a trip to Amman, Jordan, for the IAAF World Cross Country Championships triggered a relapse.

"The sleep scheduling stopped working," he says. "That sent me down the whole same path, where I was seeing sleep specialists. But no new information was available. For a few months in 2009 I wasn't running at all."

Curtis found his own solution: No matter how badly he'd slept the night before, he'd go for a daily run. He also stopped sleep scheduling and lifted his self-imposed ban on evening socializing. "The less I focused on sleep, and the more I focused on the rest of my life, that was when things got better," he says. "I won't say I'm sleeping normally, but for about two years now it's been really good."

This year, Curtis, now 26, set an impressive 10,000-meter PR of 27:24.67 and finished fourth at the USA Track and Field Championships. The ING New York City Marathon will be his debut at the distance, and his goal is to finish "between fifth and 10th place, maybe something better."

Now that he's sleeping, Curtis can dream big.
Sydney Maree: Villanova's Fallen Hero
By Kate Fagan

Inquirer Staff Writer
October 20, 2011

Daniel and Pele Maree stood shoulder to shoulder, sharing the weight of the coffee-table book The Wildcats: A History of Villanovans in Professional Sports.

Somewhere beneath the aging blue cover, their father is immortalized beside legendary track coach Jumbo Elliot and baseball all-star Mickey Vernon.

While looking for their father's page, Daniel flipped past a photo of Howie Long. Daniel stopped, returned to the skipped page.

"Howie was our dad's bodyguard during college," Daniel said, pointing at the square-jawed defensive end, a future Pro Football Hall of Famer who appeared very much capable of such an assignment.

And then Daniel continued turning the pages.

Eventually, the oversize book opened onto a spread: track star Sydney Maree taking his oath of citizenship; the world-record-holder in the 1,500 meters (3 minutes, 31.24 seconds) becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen because his home country of South Africa was bubbling in turmoil; a Villanova racing legend stepping away from the Main Line and onto the world stage.

Daniel and Pele looked down at their father's black-and-white image, his hand raised in allegiance.

"Is that the best tie he could find?" quipped Pele.

The two brothers laughed, a moment of levity in what has been a brutal journey.

Their father, Sydney Maree, two-time Olympian, onetime symbol of apartheid's injustice, is now imprisoned - the family believes unjustly - in a South African prison charged with fraud for illegally transferring government money into his own private account.

Exactly which South African prison holds the 55-year-old Maree, his children aren't sure. But the country's prisons are collectively awful, rife with disease and despair. Missing this fundamental piece of information - their father's location - seems cruelly appropriate given the cloudy circumstances of his case.

Maree had been shamed, unemployed, without a passport, and penniless since his initial arrest seven years ago, surviving by buying groceries on the debit card to which his family remotely deposited small sums of money.


The story
Sydney Maree was an elite runner, a South African who after winning the 1976 "Dream Mile" in his home country drew national attention. While later visiting the United States as part of a South African propaganda campaign, he was recruited to run at Villanova. And in his time on the Main Line, he would become a middle-distance world-record-holder, an all-American in cross-country and track and field.

Maree, who studied economics at Villanova, became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1984, the ceremony in Philadelphia. Then a dual citizen, he was a U.S. Olympian in the 1984 Los Angeles Games, though an injury prevented him from competing, and again in the '88 Seoul Games, where he finished fifth in the 5,000 meters.

He had been an athlete without a state during South Africa's struggle with apartheid, a story that intrigued every media outlet, including Sports Illustrated, which sent nationally renowned writer Gary Smith with Maree when he returned triumphantly to his hometown of Pretoria, South Africa, in 1983.

He was a hero in his home country, returning for good in 1995, bringing his American wife, Lisa, and his five children: Daniel, the youngest son and the family champion for his father's cause; Pele; Natalya; Nadya; and Christina.

He became one of South Africa's leading economists, eventually heading the country's National Empowerment Fund, an arm of the government charged with "promoting and facilitating black economic equality and transformation."

Now, Maree is an inmate in South Africa's dilapidated prison system, arrested in 2004 and charged with illegally transferring the U.S. currency equivalent of $120,000 from the NEF, of which he was chief executive, to his personal account - an amount less than half of his maximum yearly salary. The money was eventually returned in full.

The court rejected Maree's final appeal this past spring. He turned himself in to Leeuwkop, a maximum-security prison near his hometown. He began serving a five-year sentence, which the courts reduced from 10 because of the case's duration.
Maree was very quickly transferred from Leeuwkop. No reason and new location were given.

"He's OK, wherever he is," Daniel said. "Knowing my dad, if something was really wrong, he'd find a way to reach out to us, through some underground channel."


Telling the story

Daniel, 24, a filmmaker and documentarian, was already at work on the story of his father's life and isn't attempting to convince everyone of his innocence. But he believes few people have been given the chance to make their own determination.

Daniel is a graduate of American University (Maree's children returned to the United States after the charges were filed), and since 2004 he has been passionate about revealing what he believes is systemic corruption within the South African government.

"There are really specific questions that never got a chance to see the light of day in court," said Daniel. "If we had answers to some of those questions, I'm not saying it would prove my dad innocent or guilty, but it would make the whole situation a lot clearer.

"People have a right to know all of the information about the story that hasn't gotten out."

Said Pele, 25, Daniel's older brother: "We feel like we're in the middle of a political thriller."

Based on court documents, there are two scenarios of what happened with the money:

The scenario approved by the South African courts says that Maree acted independently, motivated by greed. It says he siphoned off a chunk of the government's money to his personal account with the intention of eventually keeping the money for personal use. Someone within the NEF noticed the money's absence before Maree advanced the funds.

The scenario maintained by Maree throughout the trial says his NEF superior, Allistair Ruiters, persuaded Maree to temporarily hide in his personal bank account an illegal fund transfer from the NEF to Deutsche Bank as part of a land deal. The money was supposed to go from Maree's account to Deutsche Bank without the government noticing.

Except the government was tipped off while the money was still in Maree's account. His superiors, who reached all the way to the top of the government, then closed ranks. And he took the fall.


At worst, Maree was criminal; at best, incredibly naive.

Daniel created a website, www.mareevstate.com, uploading court documents, time lines, and articles, and kick-starting a grassroots funding campaign for a documentary aiming to record sit-down interviews with everyone - heroes and villains - involved in his father's case.

"Very few people, including myself, know exactly what Sydney's circumstances are," said Villanova track and field coach Marcus O'Sullivan, a world-class miler and four-time Olympian for Ireland whose career at Villanova overlapped with Maree's. "The last correspondence was a number of years ago: We were trying to bring all of our Olympians back for an Olympic gala, and Sydney was on board to come. At the last minute, he called and said he couldn't come.

"That was the beginning of the unfortunate situation that has continued to this day. I think a lot of people are expressing curiosity but just really don't know what the circumstances are and it seems to be, geographically, so far away that it's very hard to find anyone that has sound information on it - other than hearsay. I think the lack of conversation is based on the fact that there's no conversation."

Milly Adams, a South African expatriate who lives in Exton, is surprised at Maree's conviction.

"Sydney Maree is very well-known in South Africa and extremely well-loved," Adams said. "I recall being back there in the 1980s and seeing a television piece on his accomplishments as an athlete. I never would have believed he'd be involved in something like this."

Raising Awareness

Daniel possesses hard copies of every piece of information available: the court documents and transcripts, newspaper articles, time lines, cassette tapes, and charts connecting one politician to the next.

All of this tangible information will, Daniel hopes, someday become an important documentary.

"I try to say the film isn't really concerned with his guilt or innocence. It's more concerned with raising awareness about the situation," said Daniel. "And what his story says about South Africa right now."